Thursday Spotlight: Andrew Orloski

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Tell us about your background.

I was born in West Palm Beach, Florida but am a native Pennsylvanian who found his way to Boston in the Fall of 2011. I have received a BFA in Sculpture with a minor in Philosophy from Millersville University in Pennsylvania and have participated in Virginia Commonwealth Universities Summer Intensive Studio session focusing mainly on the intersection of performance, video and object making.

Name some people, artists, artistic genres, etc. that have been influential in your
work.

When I first started working sculpturally I was very drawn to process oriented and site-specific artists whose work would hold deep psychological and philosophical meanings. Richard Serra, Rachel Whiteread, James Turrell and Do Ho Suh all come to mind. Pieces such as Turrell’s “Meeting” at PS1, Rachel Whiteread’s “ Nine Tables” and Do Ho Suh’s “Seoul Home / New York Home” all have a special place in my vocabulary. What these artists have in common is the exploration of the concept of space, and how that relationally affects us. I was very drawn to that. I began to think more of how not only space affects me, but what happens when time intersects these very complex ideas.

After attending the VCU summer seminar I was introduced to a few very influential people, namely performance artist Nigel Rolfe and sculptor Janine Harkleroad, who’s regular studio visits, critiques and reading lists turned my idea of sculpture on its head. I was suddenly making work that was thoroughly different from past work, breaking into the realm of performance and video. Books such as “Relational Aesthetics” by Nicolas Bourriaud, “Psychogeography” by Merlin Coverley, “Liquid Times” by Zygmunt Bauman and “Air Guitar” by Dave Hickey are all readings that ignited this departure.

I cannot leave Bruce Nauman and Martin Heidegger out of this section, being as they are two of the greatest influences in my current investigations.

Where and how do you get your ideas?

My ideas come from many different parts of my life, as I have many hobbies that I can barely keep up with. I play guitar, am constantly cooking, brew my own beer, play sports and recently have taken up long distance running. I have found it to be one of the greatest philosophical pursuits I have ever encountered. When I run I am quite literally defining my existence at that given moment in time and space by tracking each individual step and leaving behind tracks of my physicality. My recent work is exploring the notion of “Being-There”, a concept from Martin Heidegger. When you run a marathon, for instance, your body becomes almost blank, machine-like, while your mind is working at double time. You focus on breathing, steps, muscle failures, strides, past, present and future. You realize where you started but also realize you are no longer there. You understand there is a finish and it is a fathomable thing, but since the future may not necessarily exist, how can the finish line also? It is a classic philosophical example. How is it possible that if you understand what the words “golden” and “mountain” mean, that you can make up in your mind the idea of a “golden mountain”? This is profoundly interesting to me. I think a lot about how these things define my “Being.”

I have also done an extensive amount of traveling since finishing my undergrad and I can’t help but think that being in and experiencing a lot of various places has a lot to do with where these ideas and concepts come from as well. My most recent explorations, such as an ongoing performance “Where-I-Am”, are addressing these themes. How an action performed at different places in different times challenges the ideas of time, place, space and familiarity.

I try my best to stay well versed in contemporary art and philosophy and pull as much influence from my surroundings as possible as well. I am fascinated by everyday normal actions and experiences, mundane or extraordinary.

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What materials do you work with? Describe your technical processes.

I have run the gamut in various materials including bronze, wax, plaster, clay, wood, paper, etc. Recently I have become more interested in video and performance, which usually result in installation based work.

My technical process has changed somewhat over the years. For a while I was working quite stubbornly, thinking way to extensively about material language and whether my choice for certain objects were valid. Recently I have been much more susceptible to failure in my work. I will do a lot of tests, shoot little snippets of video, make something and then destroy it, etc. Do something common and try to figure out if it has some sort of grandeur. At the end of these tests I contemplate what I have done and how it actually becomes work. It is just like keeping a sketchbook to me, for instance my fingers are moving in space typing this sentence just as a pencil draws a line, both are documentations but with different outcomes. Since I am so interested in gestures of the body, I draw a lot of inspiration from my own body quos, such as banging my head up against a wall, or a simple snap of the finger.

What do you find to be the most challenging part of being creative? What is the
best part of being creative?

The best part of being creative is having an active mind and living in a constant state of contemplation. Funny enough, I find that this is also the most challenging part. Sometimes it is easy to over think things, like why simple gestures like a handclap can suddenly become a stand-in for existential philosophy. But the journey and pursuit of knowledge is extremely exciting to me. This is why I make things, because idea becomes form.

What advice would you give to someone seeking advice about being an artist? 

Art is visual philosophy; there are no limits in creation. In art 2+2 can very well equal 5 and that is exciting. Do not limit yourself to what you can do. Explore different mediums and ideas, read as much theory as you can. Visit museums and galleries because without a sense of what is going on from your contemporaries it will be like living in a vacuum. Give your eyes something to taste. Set yourself up for failure and find solitude in the act of creation and not the final outcome, it is here where most of your work may lie.

Nigel Rolfe once told me to stop making work from my brain and start making work from my gut. This is probably the most influential thing I have ever had said to me to this day regarding my work. Perhaps you can think about that one a little as well.

Andrew’s website


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Thursday Spotlight: Annie Irwin

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Tell us about your background.

I am currently a sophomore in the Textiles Department at the Rhode Island School of Design. Growing up in the Northern Chicago area, I was very lucky to be in an environment where creativity was encouraged. My family was extraordinarily supportive in helping me hone my passion for art. With various experiences in skill development I was able to pour myself into learning the fundamentals of drawing and painting. I have always been in love with painting, oil painting in particular. When I arrived at RISD, I was convinced I would be in school for a BFA in Painting, but with a growing fascination and a drive to add a new component to my painting, I am going to embrace the challenge of understanding and creating textiles.

Name some people, artists, artistic genres, etc. that have been influential in your work.

I am extremely inspired by Jenny Saville’s work. Not only her subject matter, but also the way she paints is decadent and incredibly robust. I also enjoy the absurdity of the Rococo period. I think there is something beautiful in works such as Fragonard and Boucher’s paintings; along with decorative arts that are indulgent in detail. Beyond that, Eric Fischl, Matisse, Rodger Bechtold, Wolf Kahn, Ivan Albright, Diana Al-Hadid, Janet Fish, Edward Gorey, David Kapp, Tim Anderson, Caspar David Friedrich, Abbott Thayer, Andrew Wyeth and Alice Neel are some of many who I find compelling. German Expressionism, German Romanticism, Fauvism and Indian sculpture captivate me. Ultimately I am inspired and attracted to the work that puzzles me, and pushes my vision into a new context that can take on multiple identities.

Where and how do you get your ideas?

I have the exciting position of not yet having a full spectrum of experiences under my belt, so many of my ideas and understandings come from the things I know, and more importantly the things I would like to know. My interactions with the people I surround myself with and self-perception play a large part in my concepts. Objects are also a constant source of story and create a completely new path to follow conceptually. In my future work I hope to be looking for ways to meld modernity and tradition in not only my subject matter but materials as well. Beyond that, the things I see in my environment influence my thinking greatly. The East Coast has exposed beautiful historical architecture and an exciting history, which I will definitely be utilizing in my upcoming work. Architecture, the grotesque, and sculpture have become my most recent, great sources of thought-provoking inspiration.

What materials do you work with? Describe your technical processes.

I try to explore any materials I stumble upon. I have most recently been using charcoal, conté crayon, Oil and Acrylic Paint, Wood and Plaster. Usually I begin with conceptual drawings, thumbnails. These thumbnails, along with writing, guide the visual expression. With my paintings, I complete an under painting that directs the shapes on the picture plane. As I begin to work more closely and in depth with textiles, I am beginning to think more in terms of fiber, fabric, pattern and color, which come from my studies thus far in the department. It is an exciting and challenging new path that I am very much looking forward to continuing.

What do you find to be the most challenging part of being creative? What is the best part of being creative?

I strongly believe that the best part of being creative is the challenge of being creative. I know that’s very redundant, but I mean it. There is a process that an artist must go through with each piece they create, failure or success. Creative processes are exceptional because they are all different and each is valid. Art and Design, along with many other fields requires problem solving, challenging problem solving. I am completely enamored in observing the way that people use design thinking and creative cognition to search for solutions. I personally feel that the creative process is one of the greatest things about being an artist. Aside from that, research is exceptionally rewarding. It is essential to fully immersing yourself in the subject matter of your work.

What advice would you give to someone seeking advice about being an artist?

Persistence through work, criticism, and most importantly through fear is completely necessary in order to create art. Don’t ever stop. It’s going to take an intense work ethic, and you will no doubt receive criticism in one form or another. The brilliant thing is that when you feel accomplished, you will succeed. It is not up to others to determine that. Lastly, while the other points mentioned would be my first advice there is always something very important to keep in mind: humility. All visions are unique, and therefore all have the potential to grow and remaining humble is crucial in the never-ending creative process.

Annie’s website
Annie on Twitter
lirwin@risd.edu

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Thursday Spotlight: Tulika Ladsariya

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Tell us about your background.

I was born in Mumbai, India and started out my career in finance and banking. It was pretty early on that I realized I wasn’t where I wanted to be. I am the kind of person who loves philosophizing and working with my hands. A lot of introspection led me to take a sabbatical from my job and head on to London to study art. Once I came back to Mumbai, I worked for an auction house and started my studio practice simultaneously. My husband’s support and encouragement enabled me to become a full-time artist. In 2009, we moved to Chicago. My art community and my work has steadily been developing since.

Name some people, artists, artistic genres, etc. that have been influential in your work.

My inspiration comes from the daily and mundane and the struggle to survive. I love to read- books are a constant source of inspiration. I especially like for art to be in public spaces for everyone to interact with in everyday life. I feel like that moment when you break away, stop, stare and reflect is the most profound encounter of the day. Artists who work with themes of social change have been a great source of inspiration for my work. Van Gogh’s workers, Diego Rivera, Surendran Nair, Anish Kapoor, Os Gemos are some of the artists whose work I find inspiring.

Where and how do you get your ideas?

My current work explores labor and issues of language and literacy. My paintings are a social commentary on the division of society through the iconography of labor. Whilst I was in Mumbai my work was more narrative. My ideas evolved from the city and its people around me- forever in motion. I photographed constantly and these images of figures at work- lifting, pulling, pushing, heaving- form the starting point. Of late, my work has been evolving in a slightly different direction. The subject matter is still the same, though the art is more about how it makes me feel. In some sense it has the potential to be more poetic.

What materials do you work with? Describe your technical processes.

In my painting technique- I primarily use acrylics and layering. Language and text is a sub-narrative in my work that I insert in a variety of ways- sometimes though acrylic transfers, or a more freehand application through molding paste. I push medium through screens to create an off the canvas three-dimensional effect. I really enjoy experimenting with different media that is compatible and has texture. With my sculptures, I use found construction material like wood, bricks and house paint. I use graffiti pens to write on them. A lot of my sculptures have a high-gloss sheen finish to them to give them a feeling of preciousness.

What do you find to be the most challenging part of being creative? What is the best part of being creative?

The most challenging part is sticking to a schedule. It is all too easy to slacken off and say ‘I’m not feeling creative today’. There are so many hindrances to studio time- personal, social, other commitments. I have to make sure that I treat it like a job or I would never get anything done. The best part is implementation of the idea. Just emptying my head of everything and working. I think the first stage in an artwork is setting up a problem and the rest is finding ways to resolve it. The latter is my favorite part. Isn’t that strange- the most challenging part is getting to the studio and the best part is being in it!

What advice would you give to someone seeking advice about being an artist?

There are so many things I learn everyday about being an artist. I it is a rare combination of perseverance, luck and skill that makes for a great artist and that only comes with time. So most importantly, stick with it. Build a community (not a network). No one ever became anything of import without having several people to thank for it. Be true to yourself. It is vital to look at things around you and be part of it all- but as important to look inside yourself and do it in your own way. Only then is there joy in it.

Tulika’s website
Tulika on Twitter
Tulika’s Facebook page
Tulika’s blog

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Thursday Spotlight: Prilla Smith Brackett

Tell us about your background.

I was born in New Orleans, and grew up in West Hartford, CT. My background is in the social sciences – a BA in Psychology and Sociology from Sarah Lawrence College and an MA in Sociology from UC Berkeley. After quitting a social service job, by chance I tried throwing a pot. I fell in love with clay, took a few classes, and for 6 -7 years worked as a studio potter. I also learned to draw from Eleanor Dickinson in San Francisco. A job change for my husband took us to Lincoln, NE, where I went back to school in 2-D. At UN-Lincoln, after getting undergrad art credits out of the way, I got a MFA in drawing and painting. My family moved back east to Cambridge & Boston MA where I’ve painted and exhibited for many years. In 2003 I started learning how to do monoprints, and now my studio practice includes both monoprints, drawing, and mixed media painting.

Name some people, artists, artistic genres, etc. that have been influential in your work.

In San Francisco Eleanor Dickinson was a role model for me: She was a successful artist, who was also married with children, and a feminist. My graduate school work was influenced by the pattern painters of the 1970’s and 80’s, Vuillard, and Bonnard. I’ve studied the work of Cezanne, the Canadian painter Emily Carr, Arthur Dove, and Joan Mitchell, among others.

Where and how do you get your ideas?

For many years I’ve been interested in landscape, and would get ideas when traveling to landscapes new to me. Then I became interested in expressing ideas through landscape. In one large project I wanted to suggest the negative impact of humans on the landscape. Liking the romantic notion of northern forests, I did research on old growth forests, and decided to explore the forests’ relationship with city trees. The images came from photos I took hiking to pockets of old growth forests in northern New England, and from trees in my city. I figured out formal ways to suggest threat and commonality. For the last several years I’ve been working with the juxtaposition of the natural and the domestic, in particular these same old growth forests and old fashioned furniture from a house that had been in my family for 90 years. I enjoy the problem solving involved with both developing an idea, and developing an individual painting or print.

What materials do you work with? Describe your technical processes.

In mixed media paintings I work on panels. The most recent paintings have begun with acrylic underpainting and printing to build up a rich visual texture. I’ve used black Cretacolor leads and acrylic inks to draw, build up textural areas, establish the image, followed by thin layers of oil glazes, and areas of oil paint. My monoprints of the last year have started with a texture woodblock which I print twice, with 2 different colors, followed by the woodblock with the forest image. I use furniture stencils, or sometimes a semi-transparent chine collé to add a furniture image. And I also print patterns of very small furniture line drawings, or a larger furniture drawing, using a polyester lithographic plate. I like to use these various building blocks again and again, in different combinations, with different color choices.

What do you find to be the most challenging part of being creative? What is the best part of being creative?

The most challenging part of being creative is coming up with new ideas. Luckily, new ideas often come from working, from doing the work. The best part about being creative is that you get to figure out what you want to do! You have the freedom to invent for yourself, from yourself. No one else is telling you what to do.

What advice would you give to someone seeking advice about being an artist?

Be very sure you want to be an artist. It’s hard to make a living and difficult to juggle family. Look at a lot of art, read widely, travel as much as you can. It’s important to have a broad knowledge of history and culture. Develop a good group of artist peers for mutual support, sharing of ideas, help with networking. Develop a strong work ethic.

Prilla’s website
Prilla’s Facebook page

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Wellspring #7, copyright 2012, woodcut, pronto plate on Kizuki Kozo paper, 22″ h x 20″ w

Thursday Spotlight: Daniel Sousa

Tell us about your background.

I was born in Cape Verde and grew up in Portugal, just outside Lisbon. My family came to the States in 1986. I studied at RISD, where I focused on illustration, painting, and animation. After graduation, I spent a few years in Boston, working at Olive Jar studios, where I animated and directed a variety of projects, mostly TV commercials.
I’ve been in Providence, RI, since 2001, and I split my time between teaching, freelance work, and personal work.

Name some people, artists, artistic genres, etc. that have been influential in your work.

I think for the most part I’m always trying to describe a very internal and private world. By reaching for that kind of specificity, I believe that I can connect with people on a more universal level. I gravitate towards work that achieves that kind of universal connection, or resonance. For that reason, I think nothing inspires me more than music, which can be so visceral. I grew up on British post-punk music, like the Smiths, Joy Division, Bauhaus, and I still feel a very strong emotional connection to that music. Unfortunately, I can’t play any instruments, so I try to achieve an equivalent emotional result through animation. I am also inspired by painting and other films, but not nearly as much. In terms of animation, I was very influenced by Russian and Eastern European animators like Norstein, Svankmajer, Kucia, Dumala, Kovalyov. Closer to home, I greatly admire the work of Steven Subotnick, Amy Kravitz, and Flip Johnson. Also, I owe a great debt to the poetry and film language of Andrei Tarkovsky.

In addition, I have been informed by painters like Velasquez, Inness, Freud, and more recently, Anselm Kiefer and Cai Guo-Qiang.

And then there’s just the world around me, everyday life. I think how you filter the infinity of information that surrounds you is what defines you as an artist.

Where and how do you get your ideas?

Thematically, I try to draw from cultural archetypes, mythology and fairy tales, as well as my own subconscious and childhood memories.

What materials do you work with? Describe your technical processes.

It really depends on the project and the kind of graphic universe that it inhabits. Minotaur was a stop-motion film, so I used a variety of materials, including wood, wire, plastic, and paper. Fable was a more traditional 2-D film, so I worked on paper and then scanned the drawings into After Effects and composited digitally.
For my new film Feral, I roughed out the animation in Flash, then printed each frame onto paper and re-traced each drawing with pencil. The drawings were then re-scanned and composited. The backgrounds are usually acrylic on paper.

What do you find to be the most challenging part of being creative?

Consistency. Good ideas come and go, and sometimes you have to work through a lot of bad ideas to get to a good one. But if you don’t do that you may never find that one good idea you were looking for. So discipline and faith in the process is really important.

What is the best part of being creative?

When you get into a groove where everything just flows and time stands still. Doubt goes away, and you’re just present with the work. Those moments are rare but they make up for everything else.

What advice would you give to someone seeking advice about being an artist?

Being an artist means something different to each person. What works for one artist may not work for another. So you have to be true to yourself and follow your own vision. Don’t be discouraged or frustrated by setbacks, but work through them to keep improving your technical and conceptual skills. It’s a lifelong quest, not something you master in a couple of years.

Daniel’s website
Daniel on Vimeo
Daniel’s Blog

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Thursday Spotlight: Carolyn Marsden

Tell us about your background.
I grew up in the suburbs of Boston, MA, in the same town as the DeCordova museum.  My parents took me to the museum often, and were wonderful about encouraging my artmaking, sending me to their after-school and summer art classes. I attended the local high school, then Dartmouth College, after which I worked for Boston magazine as a layout designer. In 2008 I left the publishing world to pursue my MFA in Photography from the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. In 2011, I got my MFA and moved to Rhode Island, where I continue to make art and work at a local publication, Rhode Island Monthly.
Name some people, artists, artistic genres, etc. that have been influential in your work.
I’m lucky to have studied with many amazing teachers. I worked with Dudty Fletcher at deCordova as a kid, and she taught me basic color theory as well as how to observe (we worked on drawing and painting from observation, but I think the general attention to observation went beyond that). I worked with Ann Walker in high school. Brian D. Miller at Dartmouth was incredible, asking me to work conceptually for the first time in my life, as well as pushing me to be conscious of the cultural references in my work. Patrick Manning and Adrienne Salinger at UNM are the most incredible artists and teachers, as well as great friends.
Themes of time, feminism, extreme attention to detail, and alternative photography process tend to jump out at me when I look at art. I am especially attracted to artists that make their work without limiting themselves to one medium. Also, I grew up in a house designed by a student of Walter Gropius, and have always thought that aesthetic influenced my work in some unconscious ways.
The contemporary sculptures at the deCordova were very inspiring to me as I grew up. I specifically remember Mark di Suvero’s Sunflowers for Vincent, though I always called it the Trojan horse. Other artists and pieces that have inspired me include Arno Rafael Minkkinen for his simplicity and long-term dedication, Cai Guo Qiang’s show at Mass MoCa 2005, Sol LeWitt for weaning me on conceptual art, Orozco’s “Cat in the Jungle” photograph, Robert Rauschenberg, Arthur Ganson, Sally Mann (particularly while I was in college), Atta Kim, all of Sophie Calle’s works for looking at boundaries, Orlan for similar, Hiroshi Sugimoto (isn’t it nice to have someone so solid around), Gary Schneider’s faces, Thomas Kellner, Nicholas Nixon’s “Brown Sisters” series, Heather Ackroyd and Dan Harvey for pushing the boundaries of the photographic medium, Yoko Ono’s, Mierle Laderman Ukeles’s, and Marina Abramovic’s performances, Candice Breitz’s video work, and Yayoi Kusama for everything. This past weekend, I went to see Rineke Dijkstra’s show at the Guggenheim; I have always loved her photographs and videos. Her video “Annemiek” especially moved me years ago and it had the same effect this weekend.
Where and how do you get your ideas?
Often I get ideas from trying to improve previous work, but I also try to get into situations where my mind can relax and wander. My most recent big idea for a project came while I was taking a long drive. When I’m blocked, I think about the things (and sometimes people) that make me very angry. It sounds antithetical to most practices, but I also watch a lot of TV — and listen to BBC news to get ideas, because my work lately has explored the disconnection between my own experience and social norms. I watch TV and listen to the media to realize ways that social norms are defined, and then think about how my personal experience diverges.
It’s more common for me to think of a subject that I need to make art around, than for me to make work that starts with a medium or aesthetic that I am trying to explore.
What materials do you work with? Describe your technical processes.
This really varies. I am generally drawn to processes with defined steps and rules, and moments of great tedium. I have made projects where I weave photographs together; this involves making two photographic prints, then slicing them and spending hours weaving them back together. Other, more recent work has involved hand sewing, or hours of work in Adobe Illustrator to make infinitely resizable graphs about pop culture. I have also redrawn photographic pixels in a grid on paper or in embroidery form.
When I work with a camera, I either work digitally with a Canon camera (and sometimes use photo-stitching techniques in Adobe Photoshop), or I use a Yashica-Mat medium format. I prefer the result and the feeling of shooting the Yashica, but the cost is prohibitive. There is always another camera to salivate over…
What do you find to be the most challenging part of being creative? What is the best part of being creative?
Being creative is difficult because it’s hard to have artist’s block. It can also be really hard to explain your work, although the explaining often helps the artist understand what s/he is doing. Being creative can also be difficult to turn off in a situation where straightforwardness or rationality is needed. Also, sometimes introducing creative and new ideas irritates other people.
The best part of being creative is sharing your work, whether it is well or badly received.
What advice would you give to someone seeking advice about being an artist?
I think the best advice would be to make art and make artistic friends. If you have a project to do, don’t procrastinate on it — for me scheduling time to make art has worked well, but it depends on what works for you. Take classes in a medium if you are able, and share your work in whatever form it takes. Enter juried shows, especially the free ones. Become familiar with the museums near you, and travel whenever you can.
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Thursday Spotlight: Patrick Earl Hammie

Tell us about your background.

I was born in New Haven, Connecticut. I grew up in Connecticut and South Carolina. I received my BA from South Carolina’s Coker College and MFA from the University of Connecticut in Storrs.

Name some people, artists, artistic genres, etc. that have been influential in your work.

In no particular order:
Auguste Rodin
Lucian Freud
Carl Jung
Jean Michel Basquiat
Robert Mapplethorpe
Joseph Campbell
Sally Mann
Barkley L. Hendricks
Cornell West
Francis Bacon
Mos Def
Luis Caballero
Willem de Kooning
Ani Difranco
Kerry James Marshall
Bruce Lee

Where and how do you get your ideas?

Looking at the world around me and how men, women and people of color have been represented inspires me to re-present them in a way that questions and complicates typical narratives.

What materials do you work with? Describe your technical processes.

I mostly work with oil paint. Once I have an idea, a piece or body of work usually begins with a collaborative photo shoot, and from there I edit the numerous photos down to a few. I see the camera in this process as a way of quickly sketching out ideas. Through this process many previous assumptions shift and change. I use the resulting images as source material for a painting. I’ll cartoon an image to begin the painting process. From that point, there is no set of rules I follow. I respond to the paint, the image and the concept as it develops seeing it as a conversation between the canvas and myself.

What do you find to be the most challenging part of being creative? What is the best part of being creative?

Maintaining patience has been challenging. When I was younger I was afraid that I‘d run out of things to say, but in reality the problem became not having enough time to follow every idea. The best part about being creative is that I can use paint to explore complicated issues and share a way of seeing that could encourage new dialogue.

What advice would you give to someone seeking advice about being an artist?

I once heard in a lecture given by Kerry James Marshall where he stated that there are 5 questions every artist needs to ask of her or himself:
Why is the world the way it is, and who says it should be so?
What is this Art thing all about?
What’s at stake?
What do you want as an artist who means to participate in it?
What is it you can do to determine or to guarantee that you achieve the kind of things you set out to achieve for yourself? Asking oneself these questions often leads to more specific questions, and I find it helpful to revisit them often.

Patrick’s website
Patrick on Twitter
Patrick’s Facebook Page

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