November Art Dare Results are in!

Thanks to all of you who participated in the November Art Dare! We were thrilled to see all of the submissions and hope that you’ll participate in the December/January Art Dare.  Judges were Prof Clara Lieu, and Teaching Assistants Casey Roonan, Lauryn Welch, Yves-Olivier Mandereau, Annie Irwin, Alex Rowe, and Deepti Menon.

   square_Casey   square_Annie   square_Lauryn   square_yves   square_Alex   DM

Below are our prize winners!


Maya Sternberg, Honorable Mention

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Elysha Tsai, Honorable Mention

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Jieru Lin, Innovative Materials Prize

jieru-lin-highres


Wendy Duong, Composition Prize

wendy-duong-highres


Hyeji Kim, Form & Texture Prize

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Emma Heyes, Process & Development Prize

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Shelly Leroux, Art Teacher’s Prize
Victoria School for Performing and Visual Arts, Canada

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Art Dare drawings by Shelly’s students below!

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ART PROF is a free, online educational platform for visual arts which provides equal access to art education for people of all ages and means.

Be notified of our early 2017 site launch by subscribing to our email list.

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Free Art Portfolio Review Event in Concord, MA

portfolio_review

FREE ART PORTFOLIO REVIEW EVENT
For artists of all ages!

Print

Concord Center for the Visual Arts
37 Lexington Rd., Concord, MA, 01742
(978) 369-2578

Sunday, June 19, 12-4pm

Bring your art portfolio and get 1 or more 15 minute reviews from professional artists. Unique opportunity to receive diverse feedback from several trusted professionals all in one day! Great chance for art students and professional artists seeking support on their work, and for high school students working on a portfolio for college admission. You don’t even have to get a review to attend this event-we’ll set up the event to create an open environment where everyone can see other artist portfolios, and learn from listening to everyone else’s critiques. This event is free, but registration is required to be guaranteed a review.


Can’t make it to this event?
3 more free portfolio/critique events and a major art education project are coming in June and July!
Stay tuned by subscribing to our email list.
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Still can’t come?
Check out my crit quickiesportfolio video critiques & Ask the Art Prof


Contact

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Portfolio Requirements
Please bring 5-8 artworks created in any media for your portfolio. Neatly organize your portfolios in advance to ensure an efficient review. We strongly prefer to see actual artwork, but we are willing to view artwork on laptops/tablets. (no phones)


Registration
This event is free, but registration is required to be guaranteed a review.
If you want to only look at portfolios and listen to critiques, no registration is necessary. Please register for a maximum of 2 slots. Register here.  If there are still slots open the day of the event, slots will be assigned on a first-come, first-serve basis at our information table. At that point, you can sign up for as many reviews as you want. You are welcome to show up the day of the event without registering in advance, however we cannot guarantee that you will receive a review. If you are not present at your slot time, your slot will be given to someone else. Feel free to RSVP on our Facebook event


Portfolio Reviewers

Clara Lieu is an Adjunct Professor at RISD, and a fine artist who works in drawing, printmaking, and sculpture. She wrote “Ask the Art Prof,” an advice column for visual artists for the Huffington Post for 3 years, and now hosts a weekly live video broadcast of the column on her Facebook page.  Watch her video critiques here.


Cynthia Katz is a photographer and has taught photography and bookbinding in the Visual Arts Department at Concord Academy for over 20 years. Her work has been exhibited widely throughout galleries in New England.


Wendy Seller is a fine artist working in digital media, painting, and photographic images. She has taught at Simmons College and RISD, and has had her work exhibited throughout galleries and museums in New England. Recently she was awarded an artist-in-residence fellowship by the Ballinglen Foundation.


Casey Roonan is a freelance illustrator and a cartoonist. Casey does editorial illustrations for the blog Narratively, and other clients. He writes and edit an anthology-format comic book called Ciambella with Mike Karpiel. Listen to one of Casey’s critiques here.


Lauryn Welch is a painter and performance artist who teaches at the Peterborough Art Academy.  Her artwork was featured on the cover of Art New England, and was recently shown in “Portraits, Expanded” at the Brattleboro Museum and Art Center.


Sara Bloem is a multimedia artist working in drawing and installation. She was recently an artist-in-residence at the University of Indonesia, where she worked on a series of drawings exploring multiculturalism. Listen to one of Sara’s critiques here.


ART PROF is a free, online educational platform for visual arts for people of all ages and means. artprof.org features video courses, art critiques, an encyclopedia of art supplies, and more.

FB    Youtube    Pinterest     Instagram    Twitter    email    etsy


PORTFOLIO VIDEO CRITIQUES
Prof Lieu offers video critiques on portfolios for students applying to art school and working artists. More info.


ART DARES
Every month, we assign a topic for you to respond to with an artwork. We give out prizes in several categories!  More info.


ASK THE ART PROF was a written column in the Huffington Post from about art related topics. Visit our Pro Development page.

Giveaway #2: Free Audio Critique Pack

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We’re doing another giveaway! This week, one lucky person is going to win an “Audio Crit Pack,” a 2 minute audio critique from myself, and artists Yves-Olivier Mandereau, Annie Irwin, and Alex Rowe on one of their artworks. (total critique time is 8 minutes) Getting feedback on your artwork can be challenging if you’re not in school, and here’s a unique opportunity to get trusted advice from not one, but four professional artists!

To enter, do one of the following by Wed., May 18, 11:59pm EST:

  1. Subscribe to my email list
  2. Post my Ask the Art Prof page to your Facebook status; be sure to use #artprof and make your post public so we can find it.
  3. Like my Facebook page.
  4. Retweet my tweet about this giveaway.
  5. Reblog my Ask the Art Prof page on your WordPress blog.

I will email/message the winner this week with directions for how to submit their artwork and a text statement (maximum 100 words) or an audio recording (maximum length 1 minute) to accompany their artwork.  The artwork is due Monday, May 23. If the winner doesn’t submit their artwork by that deadline, we’ll pick another winner.

Please note that if you win this giveaway, your artwork and audio critiques will be posted here on my blog. You can have your artwork posted either 1) anonymously, 2) with your name or 3) with your name linked to your website.


Below is a sample Audio Crit Pack:

Student Collage

25″ x 15″, cut paper collage on mat board

“’I wear makeup because I hate my face,’ is a truth that drives my lengthy morning ritual. I used collage because I wanted to mimic the mishmash of packaging in my makeup bag, and to give the piece a graphic style reminiscent of magazine advertising. I used a clear paint medium on paper to create glossy lids, a razor blade to score ridges, and experimented with translucent paper.  I recreated my makeup collection, complete with labels explaining the true intention of each product, instead of its actual labeling.”


Casey Roonan, Teaching Assistant
Casey Roonan, Illustrator & Cartoonist
“You could think about it this way: What role are these elements playing on a metaphorical level?”
Mentioned: Maira Kalman, Claude Cahun


Sara Bloem, Teaching Assistant
Sara Bloem, Multimedia Artist
“Use your materials to show that tension more clearly. Let your materials tell the story too.”
Mentioned: Louise Bourgeois


Yves-Olivier Mandereau, Teaching Assistant
Yves-Olivier Mandereau, Designer, Ceramic Artist
“This piece can definitely resonate with a lot of different people.”
Mentioned:  Barbara Kruger, Mickalene ThomasCindy Sherman


Clara Lieu, Visual Artist & Adjunct Professor at RISD
Clara Lieu, Fine Artist & Adjunct Professor at RISD
“What’s so striking to me about this piece is the absolute, brutal honesty of the text statement.”


Subscribe to my email list! I send announcements only a few times a year. There’s a big announcement coming up in a few weeks that you won’t want to miss.

Giveaway #1: Free Audio Critique Pack

Final Crit

This week, one lucky person is going to win an “Audio Crit Pack,” a 2 minute audio critique from myself, and artists Sara BloemCasey Roonan, and Lauryn Welch on one of their artworks. (total critique time is 8 minutes) Getting feedback on your artwork can be challenging if you’re not in school, and here’s a unique opportunity to get trusted advice from not one, but four professional artists!

To enter, do one of the following by Wed., May 11, 11:59pm EST:

  1. Subscribe to my email list
  2. Like my Facebook page
  3. Share any post, video, or photo from my Facebook page
  4. Follow me on Instagram
  5. Retweet my tweet about this giveaway
  6. Reblog my Ask the Art Prof page on your WordPress blog.
  7. Reblog this post on my Tumblr. 

The winner will receive directions for how to submit their artwork and a text statement (maximum 100 words) or an audio recording (maximum length 1 minute) to accompany their artwork.  The artwork is due Monday, May 16. If the winner doesn’t submit their artwork by that deadline, we’ll pick another winner.

Please note that if you win this giveaway, your artwork and audio critiques will be posted here on my blog. You can have your artwork posted either 1) anonymously, 2) with your name or 3) with your name linked to your website.


Below is a sample Audio Crit Pack:

Student Collage

25″ x 15″, cut paper collage on mat board

“’I wear makeup because I hate my face,’ is a truth that drives my lengthy morning ritual. I used collage because I wanted to mimic the mishmash of packaging in my makeup bag, and to give the piece a graphic style reminiscent of magazine advertising. I used a clear paint medium on paper to create glossy lids, a razor blade to score ridges, and experimented with translucent paper.  I recreated my makeup collection, complete with labels explaining the true intention of each product, instead of its actual labeling.”


Casey Roonan, Teaching Assistant
Casey Roonan, Illustrator & Cartoonist
“You could think about it this way: What role are these elements playing on a metaphorical level?”
Mentioned: Maira Kalman, Claude Cahun


Sara Bloem, Teaching Assistant
Sara Bloem, Multimedia Artist
“Use your materials to show that tension more clearly. Let your materials tell the story too.”
Mentioned: Louise Bourgeois


Yves-Olivier Mandereau, Teaching Assistant
Yves-Olivier Mandereau, Designer, Ceramic Artist
“This piece can definitely resonate with a lot of different people.”
Mentioned:  Barbara Kruger, Mickalene ThomasCindy Sherman


Clara Lieu, Visual Artist & Adjunct Professor at RISD
Clara Lieu, Fine Artist & Art Prof
“What’s so striking to me about this piece is the absolute, brutal honesty of the text statement.”


ART PROF is a free, online educational platform for visual arts for people of all ages and means. artprof.org features video courses, art critiques, an encyclopedia of art supplies, and more.

FB    Youtube    Pinterest     Instagram    Twitter    email    etsy


PORTFOLIO VIDEO CRITIQUES
Prof Lieu offers video critiques on portfolios for students applying to art school and working artists. More info.


ART DARES
Every month, we assign a topic for you to respond to with an artwork. We give out prizes in several categories!  More info.


ASK THE ART PROF was a written column in the Huffington Post from about art related topics. Visit our Pro Development page.

The Quintessential Problem for High School Art Students

2015-07-08 12.08.13

This summer I’m teaching 5 classes of  Drawing Foundations and Design Foundations in the RISD Pre-College program.  Every year, every class is distinct, and offers a different set of challenges for me. Despite how unique every student is, there is one universal problem that I see across the board in all of my pre-college classes:  when students stop working on their projects too early.  The majority of student artwork I’ve seen in the past few weeks is off to a good start, but is noticeably unresolved because students stepped away from the work prematurely.

This tendency to leave an artwork early is understandable; many art students fear that if they work on their projects for too long, they will ruin it. Their desire to protect the final results in order to ensure a certain degree of success shuts down their willingness to take creative risks.  Consequently, many art student miss out on opportunities that might have arisen if they had just given their project another hour.

Creating an artwork is a roller coaster ride where nothing is guaranteed. Many art students have an unrealistic expectation that an artwork should improve in a linear manner, and that if they hit a rough patch that the apocalypse has arrived and nothing in their project can be salvaged. On the contrary, I’ve witnessed students kill their projects and then resurrect the artwork later. I’ve seen students dig themselves out of seemingly hopeless situations and emerge with outstanding results.

Skeleton Drawing Assignment

Learning how to bring an artwork to true completion is one of the most important skills to gain as an artist.   If you are running a marathon and drop out at mile 15, it doesn’t matter how far ahead you were at the beginning because you didn’t finish the race.  I tell my students that no matter how flawed or unpleasant their process was, to make sure that they cross the finish line.

I once had a student who struggled enormously with the craftsmanship of a collage project.  He was extremely frustrated and clearly had no experience with the materials: there was glue everywhere, finger prints, the paper wasn’t cut cleanly, etc. However, his piece fundamentally demonstrated that he developed a strong grasp of composition through the piece, which was one of the primary objectives of the assignment. His composition was dynamic and spacious.  Although this student’s technical execution of the materials was a complete car crash, he still followed through and finished the piece. He was mortified at the critique by his poor technique, and was shocked when I commended him for his efforts. I have tremendous respect for the fact that he kept working on the piece, despite his awareness of how sloppy his technique was. It’s never fun to work on a project that you know isn’t going well, and I commended the fact that he pushed through and finished the race.

Skeleton Drawing Assignment

The difficulty is that there is no “correct” way to finish an artwork, so how do you know what is truly finished?  To figure this out, I encourage my students to intentionally overwork their pieces. This can be a painful, as you can easily lose good parts of your piece in the process, and the results are not always pretty.

I had a RISD student who worked on a charcoal drawing to the point that the surface of the paper started to deteriorate. She was up all night working, and was extremely frustrated that nothing was progressing.  When she brought the drawing in for the group critique that morning, it looked like a a civil war had been waged on her drawing. This was the worst drawing she did all semester, but she told me later that the experience was tremendously valuable. She had pushed the drawing well beyond what she thought was reasonable.  Since she went too far with that drawing, she had a better understanding of where her limits were, and was able to pull herself back for the next assignment. I tell my students to let one of their assignments be a “sacrifice drawing,” where they give up any intention of creating a successful piece, to figure out where their limits are.

SB7

If you’re an art student, stay with your pieces. Something amazing might be just around the corner, but you’ll never find it if you get up and leave. Sometimes just 60 minutes is all the difference in the world.


ART PROF is a free, online educational platform for visual arts for people of all ages and means. artprof.org features video courses, art critiques, an encyclopedia of art supplies, and more.

FB    Youtube    Pinterest     Instagram    Twitter    email    etsy


PORTFOLIO VIDEO CRITIQUES
Prof Lieu offers video critiques on portfolios for students applying to art school and working artists. More info.


ART DARES
Every month, we assign a topic for you to respond to with an artwork. We give out prizes in several categories!  More info.


ASK THE ART PROF was a written column in the Huffington Post from about art related topics. Visit our Pro Development page.

Artist Masterclass: Results

Sara Bloem Sketchbook

Artist Masterclass is a series of conversations between myself and visual artist Sara Bloem

CL:  So how did the photo shoot go this past week?

SB: It felt so legit. The models were really fantastic people, everything went pretty efficiently, and I had snacks and a heater. Definitely felt like a professional one-woman operation.  And I’m really thrilled with the material I got!

CL: I would be very excited, you got some really gorgeous shots. I think having all three models at once was the way to go, there are some interesting interactions between the models. The images definitely had an atmosphere to them which I think will greatly contribute to the final pieces.

SB: Yes, having the models interact more with each other was a spontaneous decision that came midway through the shoot. I actually wish I had done that earlier, but on the other hand, the only reason I thought of it was because all three models were there together. So yes, I think the smartest decision wound up being having them all there simultaneously.

CL: The sense of depth is so much more palpable when you have more than one figure in a scene. I especially like the shots where the models are overlapping each other, they worked out beautifully.

SB:  I think so too! It creates more of a sense of community, rather than just having the models hanging out separately, like I just put them like stickers into the room.

Sara Bloem Sketchbook

CL: I’m super psyched for you, doesn’t everything feel so concrete now? It’s like you actually have something you can hold onto, instead of some abstract idea floating around in your head

SB:  Yes! I think the problem now is almost that, inspired by the photos, there are almost too many directions I feel like I could go now. There are so many things that attract me in the photos, like the overlapping, and the power dynamics of the models interacting with each other. In the last two sessions I had them “help” each other get dressed. Sometimes the shapes of light and dark on their forms get quite abstract and I like that too.

CL:  The shapes are stunning, and the clothing is lovely too.

SB:  I also planned on collaging in Photoshop, which I will still do, but there’s so much already going on. I’m torn; I feel like I have to choose between focusing on the lovely abstract shapes that are happening with the clothing, or the interactions, or the collaging. I guess I really don’t have to choose, but it’s just so overwhelming and exciting.

Sara Bloem Sketchbook

CL:  I would simply try all of those approaches! A little bit of this, a little bit of that, by actually doing each of those approaches you’ll figure it out.  I also find that sometimes what I think is a great idea in my head isn’t actually a good idea in reality when I realize it. I think it will work itself out, just give everything a shot. Plus, who says you can’t do the abstract shapes and the interactions together?  Who says you can’t have your cake and eat it too? These are very exciting compositions, I think they are by far your most ambitious pieces.

SB: You’re right, I just need to work it out more on paper. I wasn’t planning on taking my compositions directly from the photographs as they are now but taking different groups of figures and making collaging together an environment?

CL: That’s good, the less you can approach things verbatim, the better.  I think it sounds like a great approach, you’ll be able to process and manipulate things more, which is exactly what you want to do with reference photographs. The further you can get from the references, the better. Manipulate, manipulate!

I think you’re doing so well. I feel like I’ve had so many former students contact me who are having a really hard time. I have two former students who contacted me recently, they’re struggling with depression, having no money, they don’t have an active studio practice, and had to move back in with their parents. You’re totally doing it on your own.

SB: Honestly though, I am so happy that I can check in with you on a regular basis. Without these nudges I don’t know if I’d be doing the exact same things.

Related articles:
Conversation #4: Taking Direction
Conversation #3: Preparations
Conversation #2: Logistics
Conversation #1: Solidity
Introductory Interview

Sara Bloem Sketchbook

Ask the Art Prof: How Do You Find Your Own Individual Art Style?

Accordion Bookbinding Project

“How do you find your own individual style?”

Style is important as a visual artist, it’s essentially what distinguishes you from other artists, and what keeps your work looking professional, cohesive, and focused.  The greatest artists throughout history had styles that were incredibly distinctive and unique. Think about someone like Hieronymus Bosch, who was so far ahead of his time in the 15th century with his surrealistic scenes densely packed with human figures doing all sorts of strange and bizarre acts. Once you’ve seen one Bosch painting, you can spot another a mile away.

the-garden-of-earthly-delights

The Garden of Earthly Delights, by Hieronymus Bosch


Or, consider an artist like Giotto, whose frescoes at the Scrovegni Chapel revolutionized the way that emotions were articulated through the form, lighting, and color of the gesture of the human figures. Many times, the cultural context and time period has a lot to do with whether art artist’s style is distinctive. Giotto’s frescos may not seem so unusual to the contemporary viewer. However, within the context of his time period, by comparison, no other artists were painting faces that expressed such an intense, outward pouring out of emotion. In this way, his paintings distinguished themselves from all of the other artwork being created in that time.

giotto-lamentation

Frescos at the Scrovegni Chapel, by Giotto


In an artist’s style, there are usually defined characteristics, a specific means of handling a media, or repeated strategies in an artist’s style that are consistently visible in every artwork.  When I think about the great caricaturist Al Hirschfeld, whimsical, expressive, black and white portraits drawn with fluid, organic lines are signature visual features of his work. Once you’ve seen a few Al Hirschfeld drawings, his style is so distinctive that you can spot them from a mile away.

ella_full

Ella Fitzgerald, by Al Hirschfeld


Italian Baroque painter Caravaggio was known for his startlingly realistic oil paintings which used chiaroscuro lighting and bold gestures in his figures to create an atmosphere of intense drama. Compared to the idealized and sanitized versions of figurative oil paintings that preceded Caravaggio’s work, Caravaggio’s oil paintings emphasized a grittier, more flawed view of figures.

For example,  Caravaggio’s depictions of Christ portrayed him as an ordinary man, looking as if he lived in our world.  This was a direct opposition to previous depictions of the time period Caravaggio lived in, where Christ was always painted to appear as an otherworldly figure who did not look like an real person. Caravaggio depicted the “ugly” side of real life:  he took the time to paint the dirt on someone’s foot, and heightened unflattering wrinkles in someone’s forehead with tremendous detail.  Given the environment and time period Caravaggio lived in, these visual decisions were incredibly different, and greatly distinguished his paintings from other works created during the same time period.  Think about any notable artist from art history, and it’s usually fairly easy to sum up their style with some key adjectives.

st-thomas

The Incredulity of St. Thomas, by Caravaggio


This may sound like a contradiction, but I strongly believe that the best way to find your own individual style is to try out as many different ways of working as possible.  I teach freshman drawing at RISD, where I encourage my students to explore and try out different identities for themselves.  Many students arrive at art school with very little experience working in diverse media and approaches, so this foundation is critical towards laying a premise for their artistic careers.

I push the students to dramatically shift their approaches within one semester. One week they’re learning how to make highly detailed and rendered images, the next week they’re working in a loose, painterly style. If you were to hang up all of the drawings by a single student onto one wall at the end of the semester, you would swear that you were looking at drawings by ten different people. For a first year art school student, that’s a wonderful accomplishment because what they’ve done is they’ve essentially learned multiple visual languages that they will have access to for the rest of their lives. This set of drawings below were all created by one student within a single semester, you can see that there is an incredible range of different styles, even though the pieces are all by the same student.

I want my students to achieve a versatility that will empower them to become anything that they want to be.  By directly experiencing all of these different languages, you can build an overall understanding of everything that is out there. Only by exploring the range of options can you then narrow your focus onto what it is you want to be.

If you’re looking for ideas for art projects, check out our Monthly Art Dares, where we assign a prompt to create an artwork each month. Often times many students who are interested in studying art have a strong desire, but are at a loss for where to even begin.  That’s why our monthly Art Dares are a great place to start:  we provide the launching pad and you decide where your final destination will be.


The most common mistake that I see all the time is people trying to force a style on themselves prematurely. I went to art school with a peer who was remarkably talented and seemed capable of doing just about anything. Throughout his time in art school, he experimented with many different media, and worked fluidly in contrasting styles. Everything he did was original, inventive, and beautifully crafted.  However, when he graduated and started working professionally after school, all of that changed immediately. He quickly forced this very commercial style on himself and did some of the worst work that I had seen him do in years.  The work lacked the same original spirit and enthusiasm and looked generic and derivative.

Style doesn’t develop overnight, it’s a gradual process that can take years to emerge.  The process of finding your style is very slow, and you need to develop serious skills in patience.  Allow your style to naturally evolve.  Attempts to force a style on yourself will end up looking contrived and dishonest.

Below are several videos that discuss how I developed my stylistic approach to a series of drawings of elderly figures.


Keep in mind that style is not just about the way your artwork looks, the subject matter that you communicate and represent in your artwork is just as important.  Artists are known throughout history for the interaction of their technique and the ideas they wanted to communicate.  The visual look of an artwork is meaningless if there is no concept, motivation, or purpose behind the creation of the artwork. That’s why it’s important that while you experiment and hone a diverse range of skills, that you also work on your ability to brainstorm, develop, and ultimately execute a finished artwork that has a solid and intriguing subject.

Below is a video tutorial where I demonstrate how to get started brainstorming an idea, transitioning an idea into thumbnail sketches, and then realizing that idea into a finished drawing.

Once you do find a style that works, it doesn’t mean that the creative process ends there.  If you only stick to that one style forever, you may as well be a trained monkey who can only do one trick. It certainly does work for some people, and there are definitely people out there who are very successful doing that one trick. Historically, the most compelling artists have been the ones who are constantly reinventing and transforming themselves.

matisse

Collage by Matisse


Look at Picasso:  even after the smashing success Picasso had with Cubism, he kept innovating, experimenting, and pushing new ideas.   He created new pieces that were vastly different from Cubism, like his bull’s head made from a reconfigured bike seat. Matisse went from oil paintings to paper cut outs at the end of his life. Degas switched from pastel drawings and oil paintings to figure sculpture when he started to lose his eye sight at the end of his life. These artists weren’t satisfied to be limited to one way of working for the rest of their lives, and were willing to take major risks with their work to transform into something new.

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“Bull’s Head” by Picasso, 1942


ART PROF is a free, online educational platform for visual arts for people of all ages and means. artprof.org features video courses, art critiques, an encyclopedia of art supplies, and more.

FB    Youtube    Pinterest     Instagram    Twitter    email    etsy


PORTFOLIO VIDEO CRITIQUES
Prof Lieu offers video critiques on portfolios for students applying to art school and working artists. More info.


ART DARES
Every month, we assign a topic for you to respond to with an artwork. We give out prizes in several categories!  More info.


ASK THE ART PROF was a written column in the Huffington Post from about art related topics. Visit our Pro Development page.


Related Videos
Ask the Art Prof Live: How do I Improve My Art?  How do I Find My Artistic Style?
Ask the Art Prof Live: Oversaturation, Brainstorming, Beginning a Series
Ask the Art Prof Live: Personal Themes, Never Too Late to Start Drawing
Youtube Playlist: Video Critiques on Art School Admissions Portfolios
Youtube Playlist:  How to Draw a Portrait with Charcoal and Cross-Hatching
Youtube Playlist:  Crit Quickies, 1 min. critiques on artworks


Related articles
“How can I tell if I’m skilled enough?”
“How do artists manage to get their soul out into images?”
“How do you develop an idea from a sketch to a finished work?”
“How do you make an art piece more rich with details that will catch the eye?”
“How do you learn the basics?”
“Is it bad to start another piece of art before finishing another one?”
“How do you work in a series?”
“When and how should you use photo references to draw?”
“How do you know when to stop working?”